Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Chapter Seven

Respond to the question, and then respond to another student's post.

Chapter Seven
Think about your relationships with your parents, coaches or teachers.  Have they fostered a fixed-mindset or a growth-mindset in you?  Explain your reasoning.

103 comments:

  1. Most of my teachers and my parents have fostered a growth mindset. They push me to do better and to raise the bar a little higher every time I achieve my goals. There are some teachers who use the fixed mindset. In their classes, they don't really go over material more than once since they believe it you didn't get it right away you never will. The fixed mindset teachers lower their standards so they don't look bad on paper. "Lowering standards just leads to poorly educated students who feel entitled to easy work and lavish praise" (193). I have seen this quote in practice, and it's true. Once students think that they can get away with things and take the easy road, students stop trying.

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    1. I've never had a fixed-mindset teacher of my own, but I have seen other students get stuck with them. It's really sad when students with fixed-mindset teachers get praised for doing the bare minimum, whereas students who go above and beyond with their work are simply expected to do so by their growth-mindset teachers. Ultimately, I think growth-mindset teachers prepare their students better for the competitive nature of the real world. Students who had had growth-mindset teachers know how to not only reach expectations, but at times exceed them, because they were always encouraged to do so.

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    2. I can definitely relate to the fixed mindset teachers. The quote encapsulates it well. It's bad for the teacher and the student, thankfully you've also had growth mindset teachers and a supportive family!

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    3. I love your statement about how fixed mindset teachers assume you know everything the first time. This is not true and this leaves some students behind. The statement of students taking the easy road after they are challenged is very true and I see it everyday in school. Im happy we both share that same mindset fro growing and improving and I know we aren't the only ones like this.

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    4. I can't personally sympathize with you, but it's very unfortunate that you've had those experiences. Although, from the chapter and your comment, it reminded me of my mom's work place a little. Her boss sets a very low standard for people who don't make the quota and doesn't push them to do more. Whereas, my mom is pushed to constantly grow because she does most of the work.

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  2. My parents have fostered a growth-mindset in me. Since a very young age, they have praised my accomplishments and encouraged me to "keep it up." Their appraisal and belief that I would continue to excel throughout my schooling pushed me to reach for the bar. Once I reached the bar, I had nowhere else to go except up since I had long established my drive to excel early on. Once I reached high school, my desire to surpass the average grades began to falter. My growth mindset began to mold itself into a fixed mindset. I began to focus more on achieving good grades rather than the knowledge being taught. The author says that a successful student is one whose primary goal is to expand their knowledge and their ways of thinking and investigating the world (pg 192). I had forgotten about this important aspect of education throughout my three years of high school. Fortunately, my foundation of excelling through a growth mindset in my early years hasn't faltered. I want to rediscover the ability to learn through a growth-mindset, which is why I've decided to not only continue working hard throughout my senior year, but to do so through a growth-mindset that I can use throughout college, my career and beyond.

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    2. I can relate to the "keep it up" encouragement that your parents had relayed to you since a young age. It's good to hear that you have realized, through the growth-mindset, that you want to rediscover the ability to learn. This will take you very far through college, and even propel you through a successful career.

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    3. I relate deeply to everything you said. Last year, I began to lose my love of learning. What has helped me start off the year right is to pick a historical figure and to try to make them proud. For example, maybe I want to make Alexander Hamilton proud of my AP Lit/Comp score and to make Darwin proud of my science scores. The idea of doing it for someone else has helped me to strive to do better, and has helped me to calm down a bit and to enjoy learning rather than scoring. I hope you find your happy medium between love of learning and love of achieving!

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    4. my parents are similar. it doesn't matter what everyone else is doing in class, its about how i am doing and if i understand. they try to make sure that i have all the tools i need to be able to go to college and be successful in life.

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  3. My parents have fostered a growth-mindset in me. They have always tried to help me when I was troubled. They made it clear that it is okay to struggle and that it is nohing to be embarrassed about. To struggle meant you were in the process of surpassing a barrier you once weren't even able to reach. Similar to the kids in the text, I knew that my," parents are just trying to encourage learning and good study habit" page 184. This has been a huge key to any success I have found in all areas of my life.

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    1. I'm so glad that your parents are a good support system. Most of the time, my parents help me out and use the growth mindset. However, there are times when I struggle that they give up. It means a lot to me that you have a good support system, though!

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  5. My parents and teachers fostered a growth mindset most of my life because they cared more about my effort rather than if I just got a good grade. There were times I didn't do quite well on a particular assignment, but all my parents cared about was whether I tried or not. Similar to page 178 in Mindset, parents replying to a child that didn't do so well is similar to my own parents. They look at the effort and figure out how to get the material later. Throughout my time in high school, as well, I've met teachers who were not GPA busters. All they cared about is whether I learned something new. Throughout their support, my main goal was to learn, and the good grades would follow. I am very thankful for these people in fostering the growth mindset in me and focusing on positive growth, not results.

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    1. I would definitely agree that my parents care more about effort than good grades. I believe it really helps us become better in school because were actually retaining the information. If they only cared about the grades I don't think I would learn so efficiently.

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    2. I agree with your statement about your parents. My parents also only care if I gave my 100% effort in a class. When I got my first B last year in U.S History, they were so proud of me because I tried my absolute hardest in the class. I appreciate that they have fostered a growth mindset when it comes to school!

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    3. My parents are the same way, if i come home with a bad grade or a disappointing test then we sit down and talk about it. If they know that i tried my hardest and really put effort into it then they would be fine with it. As long as i was trying then that would be good enough for them. I'm really grateful for that because if it was only about grades i think i would stress or burn myself out.

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    4. I truly do think it is important to have teachers that care more about the material learned than about the test scores. Although flawless test scores can be a good indication of memorization, they do not show the material truly learned and that can be used later in life. Those people that push that growth mindset and look at your effort and what you learn make educating so much better and worthwhile.

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    5. I agree with all of you and I feel that the best way to go about teaching your students or children, is to have a growth mindset. To see that they try their best, put in the work, and find new ways to do so will not only bring their grades up, but give them the motivation to want to try harder. If they push you into thinking you must accumulate an A, it might discourage kids to want to achieve that. My parents have always accepted that I tried the best I could and through understanding that I won't always have perfect scores, they push me to just do better.

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    6. I can relate to this Kayla. For majority of my life, I've received pretty good grades but last year in APUSH I was struggling towards the end of the semester and my mom reassured me that it didn't matter the grade, it was how hard I tried.

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  6. Chapter seven
    My relationships differ between parents and teachers/coaches when it comes to mindsets. My parents have instilled a fixed mindset in me when it comes to my personality and eagerly promote me to continue being the way I am. My parents of course want me to do better than what I did before, but they never pressure me to do better because I do that enough to myself. I believe my teachers/coaches have fostered a growth mindset in me because they always want me to improve not knowing that I want that for myself as well. Page 180 is similar to how my parents support me when it comes to challenging times in school and other work activities. The text states " .. her parents seeing how distraught she was ,tried to build her confidence. Look, you know how smart you are and we know how smart you are." Her parents were not evaluating her to harsh instead they made her feel like she did the best she could. I often get that from my parents and it actually helps me do better in my performances.

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    1. I feel the complete opposite way, personally. I feel as if my family wants me to have a growth mindset so that I can have the courage to grow, and my teachers/coaches want me to have a fixed mindset so I can be sure that I am the best that I can be all the time. If I am not the best I can be at all times, I am the worst.

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    2. It's good that your teachers/coaches have fostered a growth mindset within you. I know that it can be easy to get into a fixed mindset in school and sports.Having a growth mindset can make school and sports easier and more fun.

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  7. My parents have fostered both a growth and fixed mindset in me. On page 182 it says, “ We always hear the term constructive criticism…..Yet a lot of it is not helpful at all. It’s full of judgement about the child.” This is the situation similar to my parents. They give constructive criticism, and most of it is very helpful. It is intended to help me grow as a person and how to better myself. But so much of it causes me to fall into a fixed mindset. Suddenly, I feel like all their comments are meant to be harsh criticism on why I need to be better, even though I really know it’s trying to get me to excel. My parents are very encouraging and fostered me into a growth mindset when it comes to school. In school, they want me to try my best. They explain to me that as long as I try my hardest, then I succeeded. So, I get both a fixed and growth mindset from them. This is also similar to my coaches. I’ve had coaches who try to make my team better, and encourage me to do my best. Then there are other coaches who are very harsh and made fun of teammates who made mistakes. Or expected all of us to be amazing as the sport, with natural skill. This is also similar to my teachers who have both fixed and growth mindset atmospheres in the classroom. I’ve fostered both of the mindsets from teachers, coaches and my parents.

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    1. My parents are the same way. They show kinda both mindsets towards me. They give a lot of constructive criticism that kinda hurts and helps at the same time. Sometimes I am put into a fixed mindset because of it, but in some cases, I believe thats what helps me succeed.

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    2. My parents are just like yours. They often always said they wanted the best for me but sometimes they would kind of over use their positivity only to put more pressure on me to keep up my success. with all the pressure it wouls produce more of a fixed mindset. I find it kind of crazy that you can become a person with more of a fixed mindset when people were only trying to give you a growth mindset.

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  8. Carol Dweck states that kids can misinterpret praise, shown by her examples on page 174 and 175. Those examples are of fixed mindset people who tell their kids they are doing great even if they are doing very poorly, and how can kids improve from that? I have always been shown a growth mindset, for the most part, from my teachers, coaches, and of course parents. At a young age yes I was shown the fixed one to build confidence, but eventually I was leaned onto the growth mindset. This helps me learn and excel in whatever task I am doing. Ive been shown from the growth mindset how to bounce back from mistakes, and how to avoid them all together. Using criticism can hep students as it points out their weaknesses. This helps me the most, by showing what I can improve singles out my area of focus. This is why I use a growth mindset and my teachers do as well. This helps me very much and I believe that all adults should use the growth mindset, as it is very beneficial to the growth of whoever is receiving the growth mindset.

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  9. I don't believe that any role model of mine has forced a specific mindset on me. I think that I have formed a different mindset for different things based off my experience with other people. I, personally, have never analyzed my parents' praise in a way which I feel judged. The author writes that kids think that "If I don't learn something quickly, I'm not smart." or "I shouldn't try drawing anything hard or they'll see I'm no Picasso" (175). I don't believe that I had enough knowledge at the time to overthink praise like that. As I assess my mindset now, I realize that my mindsets change based on the situation like I stated before. Under no circumstances do I think having a combination is a bad thing, but more of an amazing thing to have. I believe that my parents, especially, have helped me to look at different situations in different ways. To sum it up, being on both sides of the mindset spectrum is why our world turns and how personal and impersonal progress is made.

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  11. Chapter 7
    My parents have really pushed the growth mindset idea into me when I was a child. Every time I said I wanted something or that I wanted to be something, my mother and father would always respond with "If you work hard enough then you can be whatever you want to be". I know it's cliche, but it really did help me as a kid, my mother was much like the mother on page 186 who sat down with her kid and said "I know you're hungry I know it's frustrating but we're learning." It's because of things like that moment that made me excited for school and to learn, to expand my knowledge. My mother implanted the image that if you work hard then you can get whatever you want to get, and thankfully that has proven to be true so far.

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    1. That would be nice to have frown up with haha. I never got the work hard speech from my parents growing up. I just got stuff, which never really worked well. I have a fixed mindset today, so maybe that it why.

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    2. I relate entirely. They expect the very best out of me no matter what it comes to. I am grateful that when ever I do want to quit something they are right behind me, but yea I also have growth-mindset parents.

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    3. I agree with you saying that if you work hard enough that you can achieve anything you want to. If you really take this mindset to heart, you can succeed in things you may have never thought you could. My parents have also stressed this mindset as well, and it has helped me have success in school and athletics.

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  12. CHAPTER 7
    I think my parents have fostered a fixed mindset within me. At a very young age I was interested in art and i drew a lot of drawings. My parents always praised my talent creating a sense of pressure within me. Sometimes I didn't think my drawings were good enough because I was always trying to be the best artist. "I shouldn't try drawing anything hard or they'll see I'm no Picasso" (175). I relate a lot to that quote because I was stressing about possibly not being a good enough artist, all because I grew up constantly getting praised for artistic ability.

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    1. i can relate to this a lot since i usually feel more scared when i get complimented on things that i invest my time in and feel more pressure

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    2. I understand what you have gone through. It is tough to have people criticize you for not being "the best" at whatever you are doing. A lot of people have struggled to keep up with their progress when they have always been looked at as talented. The violinist Jascha Heifetz also dealt with this issue of self-worth. He was marked as a prodigy at a very young age. Through practice and determination, Heifetz was able to find his way and became one of the greatest violinists in the world.

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    3. Praise and recognition are great but it all comes down to how you feel. I had the same problem with the build up of pressure but it didn't really come from the praise it came from my lack of confidence. I always get the recurring thoughts of not being good enough regardless of what a few people think and that's when I begin to doubt myself and the pressure begins to build.

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  13. I dont think i was fostered with wither mindset. I never got the work hard speech, but i wasnt consulted when i lost like elizabeth (Pg. 180). I got stuff when i got good grades, but that was it. That seems like it would give me the growth mind set, work hard and youll achieve, but ive never really worked hard. Grade school stuff was easy. This may have been what inspired me to have a growth mind set now.

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  14. i think my parents have fostered a fixed mindset on me since they themselves have them as well. they think about the cons more rather than the pros. a quote that reminds me of them is "I shouldn't try drawing anything hard or they'll see I'm no Picasso" (175).i also am like them but i do try sometimes to think with a growth mindset.

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  15. For the most part, my parents and teachers have fostered a growth-mindset in me. Their actions do send the message of “You are a developing person and I am interested in your development.” (Pg 173) My current percussion teacher, for instance, reassured me that making mistakes right now is fine because he is there to teach me how to learn from them. I am happy that I have such a support system in my life.

    My parents have always been here for me in that they say that I am doing what is right for my future. They have taught me “to love learning,” to “learn and think” for myself, and “to work hard.” (Pg 199) That is exactly what I do. I do love the challenge of new material and learning how to adapt to the jargon being thrown at me. By keeping in mind that I am the architect of my life, they have encouraged me to reach my full potential.

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  16. Chapter Seven- it's hard to tell, but my but my mom has more of a growth mindset. Unlike my dad because he has more of a fixed mindset. My mom is more spontaneous and she is always pushing me to do things that are out of the ordinary. My dad isn't as outgoing, as my mom but they both push me to do my best. My boss especially has helped me get into the growth mindset. When I can't do something, I ask for help or ask what she thinks about it. She gives me her feedback and then I realize how I should be doing it to get the correct outcome. From that, my talents are always growing and I learn that I am very good at some things, and others I need to work on. "I shouldn't try drawing anything hard or they'll see im no Picasso" (pg. 175). I can relate to this very much because people don't want to push past their limits and try new things because they are afraid of people rejecting their creativeness. People think that being out of the ordinary is not a good thing, but that is what makes us all different and that is how we are all unique in our own ways. To think about it, no one is normal. The people who have a lot in common may consider themselves normal because that's all that they know. But once someone else who comes into the room and they have a different fashion style, or they "look different" everyone makes fun of them. I've always grown up to be acceptive of everyone. I try my hardest to be, because you don't know that person so how can you judge them? Anyway, to finish off my thought, my art is my art because it's how I like it. And we should all be accepting of others.

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    1. My mom is similar. She always encourages my interests and wants me to have new experiences. The difference is I had to learn to evaluate myself and be harder on myself because like a lot of moms she thinks that everything her kid does is great and that stopped her from giving criticism when I really need it.

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  18. I believe my parents had fostered a fixed mindset within me. From a young age, it was more about the results than what it took to get there. I was always the "naturally gifted" of their children and was praised for my intelligence rather than all the work it took to be seen that way. So when I did not achieve flawless scores and outstanding achievements, I was no longer seen as the smart kid: exactly what they wanted and bragged about me as. Like the girl that went to Harvard on page 189, I began to see those scores as a direct correlation with my self worth which makes me truly believe that the pressure that the fixed mindset pushes on me makes me feel like I have to prove my worth and competence to them through test scores and report cards they can show my friends and family.

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  19. My coaches and my mom have fostered growth mindsets in me. When I was interested in art my mom always pushed me to pursue it. She bought me a drawing tablet and she talked to me about future goals and careers in art. When I fell out of it she told me that if I wanted to improve I would have to continue drawing. I don't want to say she gave me a fixed mindset but she did say things similar to the statement on page 174, "Look at that drawing. Martha, is he the next Picasso or what?". When that happened it made my sort of rival others. My coaches were similar but more critical. They praised me when I PR'd but they had awareness of how you get from point A to point B, through practice and working hard.

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    1. I too have been in a similar situation because when I was younger, I was interested in drawing. However, no matter what I did, the pieces would not come out as I would have liked. This did not stop me because I kept practicing until I saw results. Like you, I have gotten from point A to B through perseverance.

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  20. I believe my parents foster both, a fixed and growth mindset on me. I think it depends on the situation. If I do bad on a test, my mom would either say, "I know you could've done better" (fixed mindset) or "We will work to make sure the next test is better" (growth mindset). However, my parents never punish me when I do bad at something like the boy at the top of page 186's parents did. when my parents help me, I feel like they are genuinely there to help me be the best I can be, whatever that may be. And I feel like I judge myself, more than they judge me. Although this never happened to me, because I think I have too high standards for myself, I have seen my parents threaten to punish my sister (take her phone etc.) if she doesn't bring up a grade. Although this is fixed mindset in a way because they feel she should be better, I feel that if you think your kid has more potential than they are showing (they aren't studying for example), its ok to motivate them in some ways.

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    1. I also believe that i judge myself more than my parents do. I think that parents are less harsh on children that have a lot of self-discipline.

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  21. My parents have never forced anything upon me. Throughout my entire life, they have let me be me without ever interfering with my decisions no matter how misguided they may seem. When I made a mistake they wanted me to learn from it, just like when I succeeded they wanted me to feel the sense of accomplishment I gain from doing it on my own. I am extremely grateful that they never made me believe anything they did. My parents gave me the information necessary to make ethical decisions that I believe are right or wrong. They "let me think for myself" (p.190) and that's one of the greatest gifts they could have given me. So answering the main question have they forced a mindset upon me, that would be a resounding no.

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    1. One of the greatest things about growing up is that you are able to start making your own decisions. Now that we are seniors we can finally make our own choices and begin to start piecing our life's together on our own. Our parents won't be there to help us every step of the way so for your parents to let you make your own decisions and think for yourself they are giving you the opportunity to be the one to choose whether or not you have a fixed or a growth mindset because no matter what kind of a person you are or what you choose they will love you unconditonally and will be on your side no matter what. They are just preparing you for the real world.

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    2. I agree completely; parents letting their kids decide for themselves what is right and what is wrong is truly a gift. Learning from your mistakes and learning how to think are much more important than being told what to think and never being allowed to make mistakes.

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    3. I agree that the greatest thing my parents could of done was give me my own decision for everything because this helped me grow more as a person, a student, and an athlete. I can't agree that my mom didn't influence my mindset because she was open to letting me make my own decisions. I think that influenced me to have more of a growth mindset because I was open to doing more things instead of staying with the norm or having a fixed mindset on my decisions.

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  23. My parents, coaches, and teachers have all usually fostered a growth-mindset in me. Most of coaches expect me to work hard and push me to take the extra step to succeed. My teachers have helped me to go the extra mile when it comes to academics. They offered me more challenging work and placed me in project tree. My parents were my biggest supporters throughout my life. They were always there for me when times were tough. They taught me the basics on how to persevere in difficult times and remain optimistic. When I failed, the reassured me that I would become better from the experience. When I didn't give my best effort, they didn't let it slide. Through constructive criticism, they "tried to encourage learning and good study habits."(p.145) My parents were the people I looked up to most growing up, and I knew they would help me in all aspects of my life. These adults helped shape my growth mindset, and all of these role models help mold me into the well-rounded and positive person I am today.

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    1. I like your use of the term constructive criticism. It clearly shows that people who care about you and want you to improve in any aspect are willing to explain to you in a positive manner what you need to do to improve, not just blatantly point out your faults. I can also relate to having been taught to remain optimistic when times are tough. I think this a trait that everyone should have because it is so helpful.

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  24. My parents did everything they could to create a supportive environment that helped me develop a growth mindset. They always tried to make sure that I was trying my hardest to learn and take opportunities offered to me. More importantly they made sure that when I got frustrated or upset I would not blame myself or put myself down. Similar to the conversation Phillip and his father have on page 149, my parents always made sure that I knew it was okay to make mistakes. Similarly, my teachers and coaches expect my best work from me. They know what I am capable of and use positivity to make me my best self.

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    1. Same as your parents, my parents also taught me how to handle failure. They made me understand that failure is just a part of life and it only makes you stronger as a person. Without their emotional support, I don't know how I would have made it through life. Their positive reinforcement allowed me to build a growth mindset and succeed in life.

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  25. My teachers and parents have fostered a growth mindset in me for the most part. When I was in Kindergarten, I had to take special afternoon classes that were for kids who were very far behind the other students. Even though I didn't seem like I'd have much intelligence, my teachers and parents always made sure I knew that I could learn more and that every day I was getting smarter because I was putting in effort. Dweck states that "praising children's intelligence harms their motivation,"(pg 175) which I think is true because I probably would have stopped working hard as a kid if I thought it was pointless because I was just not intelligent. The people important to me made my have a growth mindset because they always praised my hard work and studying, not my inherit intelligence.

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  26. I like you're statement explaining that praising intelligent harms motivation. I agree with your sentiment sayin that you wouldn't have worked as hard if you were told that you were great at everything. Personally, I believe that this is a problem facing us in the future. With parents praising children for every little accomplishment, this dilutes the bigger ones in life that actually mean something.

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  27. "Lowering standards just leads to poorly educated students who feel entitled to easy work and lavish praise" (193). I believed that is true because no matter how hard I try I know that my mother has good intentions and has pushed me to have a growth mindset and be the best that I can be but I have a fixed mindset because she is so criticizing and I know that no matter what I do I will never amount to be good enough for her.

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    1. I like the way you out this. I too feel like no matter how good i am at school i will never impress her or be as good as other students

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  28. Chapter 7
    Brian Byrnes
    All of the people listed, parents, coaches, teacher and have been the ones inspiring me to expand my skills and my mind. On the other end of the spectrum, like the part about the teachers in this chapter (p. 201), I have had educators with different mindsets. I've had both fixed- mindset teachers and growth ones. My math teacher as of current spends 1 hour of class going over homework, leaving only 20 minutes to learn new stuff and she doesn't assign as much homework because she wants to make sure we know the material. She has a growth-mindset. Many other teachers just speed through everything which is more fixed and demand that you come up and ask them for help.

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    2. Hey Brian! It's interesting that you bring up teachers as your main point of choice. It's also interesting how different teachers can use different mindsets to try and get their students to learn. Although, in your case it seems that your teacher really wants you to succeed, which in the long run could mean so much more than you may think now. Keep it up buddy!

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    3. I too have also had educators with different mindsets. Similar you, I have had teachers that have spent little time through a lesson not really understanding that students are capable of learning if they could help out and explain it more, rewarding the students that already know the concept by praising them in class.

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  29. My parents fostered both a growth and fixed mindset in me. when i was younger I was often praised for my accomplishments and reinsured that i was intelligent. Although i was quite successful in academic, artistic, and musical concepts, my parents felt that there was room for me to grow in the social aspect. The author was correct when she wrote,”praising children's intelligence harms their motivation,"(pg 175) i was very shy as a child, but i was not motivated to come out of my shell. I was content with who i was because i believed that intelligence outweighed socialism, however my parents continued to show me that i needed to have a balance in my life. I am very thankful that my parents were able to teach me confidence while also promoting me to try my best even when i failed a few times before.

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    1. I feel that my parents were the exact same way when I was a child. They would always applaud my accomplishments and would always tell me that I had all the brains in the family. Also, I completely agree and relate to your last sentence. My parents also taught me to try my best even if I failed the first time and I am incredibly grateful to have such parents. I'm glad that we can relate on this subject, and I am very happy that you found a nice balance between socialism and intelligence. :)

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  30. I feel like my dance coach has a growth mindset. Last year was my first yesr joing the dance team snd i was not good at all but i loved to dance. She saw thw potential in me snd deciding to tske a chance on me. "You sre a developing person and i am interested in your development." i feel like she definitely thinks tjis way and its helped me to grow not only as a dancer but sd a person. Knowing that she has faith in me to grow snd gived me the environment to grow is very calming. I think every teacher snd coach should hsve a growth mindset

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  31. I feel as if coaches and parents always want the best for their team or children but i also feel as if they have different a different way of showing it. They always want you to have a growth mindset but sometimes they end up showing you their fixed mindset side which will only lead you to follow them into that sort of negative way of thinking. I feel as if coaches and parents should realize how much their negative actions or words can really make a bigger impact on someone than they think. On the other hand I feel as if teacher always try and stay in the lane of growth mindsets and i would say they all do a pretty decent job at it. They are really good at boosting your ego up when you choose to bring it down. They really do want you to succeed in life but some teachers show it better than others by offering to stay after or having personal time to help you. i personally really haven't encountered a teacher with more of a fixed mindset.

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  32. Like Marva Collins, my parents have a growth mindset towards my learning and development. Even though Marva Collins knew that some of her students were a challenge to work with, she was motivated to teach them. Shortly after, they were motivated to learn too. And because of her "contract," they soon developed a broader mindset on how to reach success, even knowing they were incapable of knowing certain things at that moment. My parents are always giving me new ways on how I approach success; they are very understanding about how I learn and that if I don't succeed right away, to just keep trying. Whether that be about school or other daily activities, they just want me to give it my all. That encouragement is what pushed a growth mindset into my head because I'm more open to constructing my learning abilities and finding new ways to help me improve. (Page 195)

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  33. I think all the role models in my life such as my parents have fostered a growth mindset with me. My mom has always taught me to except failure and learn from it, because my mom knows that I have a fixed mindset that failure is bad and it shouldn't happen to me. Just like the book my "parents were just trying to encourage learning and good study habit", (page 184) when she'd say that we all grow from our mistakes because this helped me create a great study habit with school by never giving up.

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  34. Chapter 7:

    I believe that my parents have fostered both a growth and fixed mindset in me. Ever since I was young my parents would say I was the "smart" child out of my siblings. They would praise my good grades and expect nothing less than high achievements.(Fixed Mindset) They believed that any grade C or less in a class was unacceptable and had to be raised. However, though the article states that "praising children's intelligence harms their motivation"(175), this wasn't the case for me. I was more motivated because my parents also praised my effort and pushed me to work harder.(Growth Mindset) When I would get a bad grade, they would always say "you can do so much better than that" or "you can raise the grade if you work harder". This made me strive to try harder and to be better in order to satisfy my parents. They taught me that I had to get good grades; but if I didn't, I just had to put in more effort.

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    1. I feel that same "push" from my parents to excel in school as well. I believe that I am a good student etc. but my parents set high expectations for me as well. I've learned that if you have a growth mindset and have high expectations for them, you can land well no matter what because hard work gets the A's in the classroom.

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    2. I totally agree with your response and that's similar to my parents. I, too, am the "smart" one, and I am the oldest. I have set the standards for my younger sisters and I believe I have set a high bar. Maybe that's what my parents wanted in me. They saw me as a role model at an early age and they made me work for everything, and just like you said if it wasn't satisfactory I just had to push a little harder.

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    3. My mom is the same way. In my household i am the "smarter" child. Even when i was young my family would praise me for my good grades and it would make me want them more. This has definitely helped me in school and made me want to try harder. I am grateful for this mindset that they set in me.

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  35. CHAPTER 7
    My mom has definitely fostered a growth mindset on me. She always encourages me to keep going and never give up on something I believe in. She has consistently taught me “to love learning,” and “to work hard." (Pg 199) My dad, on the other hand, does not understand the concept of a growing mind. He compliments me by saying, "you're a good kid" and "you're very smart," but compliments such as those seem to be ineffective. When he shares those compliments with me, I know he means well (and he thinks he is being a very nice person); however, I then feel obligated to continue being a "perfect" role model for my three younger siblings and for anyone I encounter. I have noticed recently that it adds a ton of pressure to my everyday choices (which might turn out to be better for me in the long run).

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    1. I can totally relate to your mother telling you to never give up on something you believe in. My mom has also always taught me to never, ever give up on something I truly love. I also agree with the feeling of pressure you feel when someone sees you as a role model. My parents have always seen me as a role model for my younger brother and at times I feel totally pressured to keep up with that role. I do feel both our parents just want the best for us and want us to succeed. :)

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  36. Personally, I have always had a growth mindset bestowed to me by my parents, coaches, and teachers. But when things did not work out the way I wanted to I had to adjust to a fixed mindset and try to find something new. When I have had tougher classes in the past I have always had to strive for a disciplined growth mindset because I always want to get the best grade I can get in the classroom. This contradicts my fixed mindset on sports because if I set high expectations for myself whatever sport I may be playing, and this requires me to have a fixed mindset. I have this fixed mindset because I feel like I have to be at a top level in certain sports but when that happens I just have to give in to it sometimes.

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  37. Coaches that I have had in the past have instilled a growth mindset in me. Instead of going on a tyraid like coach Bobby Knight, one of my soccer coaches would take the time to help you when you made a mistake. Practice was for practicing and improving, and if a mistake was made, everyone would stop and my coach would explain what went wrong and go over it until we go it right. It is important for athletes to approach sports with a growth mindset with respect to winning and losing. It is almost more beneficial to lose rather than win, because I know for me personally I learn more about what I need to work on from a loss rather than a win. It makes me think harder and work harder fixing my mistakes and driving to get better. Just like for Wooden's team, "It is success that has become the enemy," rather than losing being the enemy.

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    1. I relate very closely to where you talk about how learning about more to work on from losing than winning. I also believe when you speak about how losing is not the enemy that it breaks the ideal role of failure and how not all loss can be a negative experience. I also feel the same way when you speak of how athletes should approach sports with the growth mindset instead of a fixed one.

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    2. I agree with you when you said losing is more beneficial than winning. When I lose, it makes me notice mistakes and it makes me not want to lose again. I also agree that growth mindsets are extremely beneficial in sports, and that losing and winning both have pros and cons.

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  38. I think that my parents fostered a growth mindset in me as i grew up. whenever they would interpret or react to my behavior, they would be constructive to make sure that i would not fail at what i was trying to do(186). Aside from teaching me how to accept failure, they were extremely supportive with anything that I wanted to set my mind to. and in the long run, it worked for the better as i am always determined to succeed in any possible way.

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  39. I feel that growth mindset teachers are found more in advanced classes. As a student in high school i have come to realize that my teachers in my honors/AP classes have pushed me to not only do better but to learn more. In my regular classes, if someone didn't understand something, it's not that the teacher didn't care but it was more of a "just move on" type of attitude. When i am pushed to do better and reach the highest success i actually achieve much higher things than i thought was possible. These teachers have made me acquire a determined attitude to succeed. Also, in soccer, my coach definitely had a fixed mindset. If i wasn't good at a particular thing he wouldn't have me work on it because he thought "well she isn't good at that. she can never be strong in that." however over the summer i proved his mindset wrong by practicing on my own and achieving what he thought i couldn't. I believe that is a growth mindset quality that i have. That has been taught to me ever since i was a kid. My mom would always encourage me to try again she never told me to give up and helped believe that i can suceed in my weaknesses.

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    1. I can really see how honors or ap teachers have more of a growth mindset and regular classes the teachers think that if you don't get it, you don't get it. I can also see how in sports maybe the jv coach thinks a player won't get any better, but the varsity coach wants you to keep practicing and improve.

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  40. Both my teachers, coaches, and my parents have fostered a growth-mindset in me. That is an easy question because you just have to think about the times they tell you to practice to do better or work harder to do better. All of them try "to encourage learning and good study habits."(p145) I think because of that I have a growth mindset that if I continue to work hard and practice I can achieve great things.

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    1. I agree that they all fine off a growth mindset. i believe they push you hard for a reason because they know you are capable of it and i believe because of that it also gives you a growth mindset whether it's school or sports.

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  41. I believe growing up my parents guided me through life using a fixed mindset view while my coaches in sports have used a growth mindset method. As I grew up my parents have always ingrained into me that once I have a job and a house I can be happy but until that happens I should keep weary. Being exposed to this planned course of action for my life I believe has affected how I perceive what it takes to be happy and enjoy what life is truly made of. Also I believe that my parents exposing me to a fixed mindset style of life has affected how much effort I put into certain things in life, like school and sports because my parents have always said that if I can go into college with more scholarships and experience I will be able to be more successful. As I have grown up I believe that my mindset has changed in the way that I focus on certain aspects of school, and I also believe that I have felt that if I cannot complete something perfectly I should not attempt it which I believe goes along with the quote "They were demoralized by the ideal they could never hope to be."(pg.192) I do appreciate though being exposed to a certain amount of growth mindset with my coaches though in the way that they talk about how yes winning is important but that's not all that matters; in their eyes it's more important for us as players to become better more rounded people than to win one out of 30 games.

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  42. Chapter 7

    I know that within our school life, usually the growth mindset is implemented within us. We're always taking standardized test, for example, to check our growth and in seminars we discuss how to adapt better habits to stimulate growth, like on page 140. However, I feel like within the math subjects at school, a fixed mindset is set. I lucidly recall one of my previous math teachers saying to my classmates and I that "Math is simple: you either get it or you don't." And because I heard that, I've always believed that. If I didn't understand something in math and I tried it once or twice, I never let myself get caught up in that problem. I also felt like you really couldn't study math. I think honor students can relate to this especially because many honor students rarely study, we're just good at remembering and recognizing things. I just recall always feeling that all math was either a yes or no type of thing; you either like math or you don't. And as of recently, I've realized that math isn't like that all, it's so much more complex.

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    1. I completely agree that math usually harbors a fixed mindset. I also think literature tends to encourage a growth mindset. You have to learn to analyze the right way and learn to study in the right way. I always thought it really was difficult to study math too since honors students really have been conditioned to just memorize and regurgitate information.

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  43. My parents have always tried to instill a growth mindset in me since childhood. They never tried to force a fixed mindset on me, saying I could be whoever I wanted and that I can learn from my mistakes. My parents as well as my teachers would give me constructive criticism to help me grow. On page 182, the text states, "We always hear the term constructive criticism…..Yet a lot of it is not helpful at all. It’s full of judgement about the child.” I chose this quote to disagree with it. Yes, harsh criticism given in the wrong way can hinder a child. However, criticism executed and delivered correctly can be extremely beneficial for a healthy growth mindset. As a musician, I have no choice other than to take the criticism I am given and learn to apply it to my music in order to advance. I can then apply this mindset to the rest of my everyday life. I believe that giving constructive criticism can harbor a growth mindset

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I think your post is interesting since from a young age I've always hated criticism of any kind because I felt it was a direct attack of my character and it makes me think maybe it is because of my fixed mindset. Later on in my life I have come to agree with the fact, especially as an artist, that if I wasn't critiqued I would be a terrible artist and it is very necessary for growth and you shouldn't have to wait for you to grow up to be accustomed to it. Maybe your personality for what you're passionate about leans on a growth mindset more than mine does.

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  44. Chapter 7
    All of my coaches and both my parents fostered the growth mindset with me. They told me that there is always room for improvement, and failure just leads to success. On the other hand, school fostered a fixed mindset with me. School is completely based on your GPA and class ranking. Everyday there is competition between students for who got the best test grade and what their class rank is. For me personally, this competition stresses me out and makes me focus too much on my GPA. Instead of focusing on what I do know, I focus on what the person next to me knows that I don’t know. This really pushed me into having a fixed mindset, if I fail a test, I am a failure. School doesn’t encourage effort and “trying your best” it encourages getting straight A’s . I feel that this makes a lot of students give up, because even if they are trying their best, the school doesn’t acknowledge it. Now I don’t agree with taking it easy and letting everyone pass because they did their best, because that “ just leads to poorly educated students who feel entitled to easy work and lavish praise (193)”. I do,however, believe that effort should be noticed and should be a factor in class because it would keep a lot of kids believing that effort does lead to success.

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  45. Chapter 7

    My parents have always pushed me to try and better myself, and keep learning. this push has helped me to develop a growth mindset. as talked about, my parents have taught me not to this of school as school, but to think of it as my job, and at ones job, no one gets a trophy for doing what is expected. this idea goes with the quote
    ”praising children's intelligence harms their motivation,"(pg 175) because i don't get awarded meeting expectations, and if something is hard, then i have to just think my way through the problem or reach out for help so that i can succeed.

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    1. I agree that people should not be praised for doing what's expected of them. It creates a system of comfort and makes the person expect praise every time they do something that they already should be doing in the first place. Conversely,a person may feel judged or attacked if they don't receive praise for doing things after growing accustomed to it.

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  46. Think about your relationships with your parents, coaches or teachers. Have they fostered a fixed-mindset or a growth-mindset in you? Explain your reasoning.

    Though my parents often fostered a growth mindset in me as a child I feel as though I was often a victim of having a fixed mindset in a growth mindset household. When talking about success and natural talent art is a sore spot for me. When the book says “I shouldn't try drawing anything hard or they'll see I'm no Picasso”(page 175) it was like it was reading my mind. My parents often loved encouraging me to do the things I did well and to let me know that my accomplishments meant something to them but I felt as though I had to keep up this facade of being naturally talented even though I didn't feel like I was. Through this chapter the book hints at the idea that people view struggling as showing weakness. When in reality struggles are the very thing that allow us to grow. I appreciate all the people who have ever reassured me that I wasn't going to fail cause I knew what I was doing and I was smart that doesn't mean that the added pressure didn't hinder my believe in myself. Later in life my parents and other adults in my life changed how I viewed failure in my life but it's hard to say that my previous mindset doesn't still remain. Simply put even though I grew up in a growth mindset enviromeant, the constant encouragement to push myself even harder though I had succeeded, I still found myself being fixed.

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  47. My mother has fostered a growth-mindset because for as long as I could remember, she has praised my efforts rather than any other aspect. She will say to “Try my best” in everything I have done because I put all my effort into everything. Even if the outcome was not a favorable one, she will reassure me, that since I have tried my best, there is nothing to worry about. However, every time I have failed something , I have a feeling that “ my parent won't value me if I'm not as successful as they would like”(190). This feeling, I believe, is the foundation of my development of a fixed-mindset. I believe that I have developed this kind of mindset because of the stress of high school. But recently, I have challenged my own mindset by slowly correcting it.

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  48. I believe majority of my coaches, teachers and parents have a growth mindset towards me and the things that i do. My coaches never lessen the amount of conditioning or practice because they know that we, or i, can take it all. They wouldn't put us through something we couldn't handle. My teachers definitely can tell between students on who can handle what. They will not give less work or not care when they know u are intelligent enough for it. And my parents will never lower their standards for me. They believe in the things that i can do and that the things that they say can motivate me to do better.

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  49. CHAPTER 7:

    My parents, teachers, and especially my coaches have fostered a growth mindset in me. My entire life my parents have taught me to be the best I can be and to always try no matter what. On page 180, the text reads, "Her parents seeing how distraught she was ,tried to build her confidence". When I'm stressed, my parents always try to calm me down and tell me that I am good enough and I can push through whatever struggle I am going through. I've always found it crazy how some people quit things so easily, but maybe it's just the way they've been taught. Im used to always being being pushed to my limits and to even go beyond my comfort zone in life. At school, I used to think I wasn't smart enough to get good grades. My teachers began to push me and teach me that If i try hard enough, I will succeed. In sports, I also used to have a fixed mindset about things. I never thought I could be good enough until I actually started practicing and trying. My coaches taught me "practice makes perfect" and though nobody is perfect, practice does make success. I am so grateful the people in my life have fostered a growth mindset on me because without it I honestly don't know where I would be right now.

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    1. I agree with what you said about teachers pushing you over the line you never thought you could cross. Teachers are probably some of only people that really try and help you, not tear you down when you don't understand something.

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  50. Growing up, my parents and teachers have always fostered a growth-mindset in me, as a mentor should. They have always wished the best for me and always believed that I could do much more with my ability. They constantly told me that I could enhance my capability and performance as long as I remained persistent and focused. Sometimes they would rather prefer my already known knowledge than my ability to learn, but I took these events as memorandum that I must further enhance my potential. In page 176, the author mentions that they were praised for their intelligence rather than their efforts. The author then says that this was a great learning disability for them. Like the author, being praised for what I knew and not for what I could know caused me to perceive situations that required one to spend time to understand what is needed as situations that I must not waste my time on.

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  51. I feel that my wrestling coaches work everyday to impress a growth mindset within me and the rest of the team. We are all always pushed past our "limits" and given corrective feedback when any of us slack or show signs of be willing to quit (pg. 182). Much like the example of Billy and the sloppy homework on the next page, some people may be offended by the criticism we receive for slight mistakes; however, deep down I know they are so tough on us because they want us to grow and become the best that we can be as wrestlers and as people..

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  52. For as long as I could remember my parents have fostered a growth-mindset in me. They have always encouraged me and my sister in everything we do. In the section "Messages About Success" (174-176) it was said that the words that are said from the praise could be even worse than being mean. Any time my parents give me any praise, I never twisted the words into thinking it is something bad. I always take it the way they mean it, for me to know that they are proud of me with whatever I do. Their love and support is what gives me the growth-mindset. Without this support I would think that what I do would never be good enough.

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